ABOUT THE GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

There are many pages on our website.   Please look at all of them.
 Our last page has informative information. 
We now have individual pages of all our beautiful dogs, some of the pages (females) have pictures of their previous litters.
The pictures are always changing with new litters arriving. 
Above is a drop down that says "more", that is where you will find the other page.....

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting
Bradford's K-9 Corral website.
We look forward to seeing you in person.


The German Shepherd is a breed of medium to a large-sized working dog that originated in Germany. The breed's officially recognized name is German Shepherd Dog in the English language, sometimes abbreviated as GSD and was also formerly known as the Alsatian in Britain. The German Shepherd is a relatively new breed of dog, with their origin dating to 1899. As part of the Herding Group, German Shepherds are working dogs developed originally for herding sheep. Since that time, however, because of their strength, intelligence, trainability, and obedience, German Shepherds around the world are often the preferred breed for many types of work, including disability assistance, search-and-rescue, police and military roles, and even acting. The German Shepherd is the second-most popular breed of dog in the United States and fourth-most popular in the United Kingdom.


Lifespan: 9 years – 13 years
Weight: 48.50 pound (22 kg) – 70.55 pound (32 kg) (Female) · 66.14 pound (30 kg) – 88.18 pound (40 kg) (Male)
Height: 21.65 inch (55 cm) – 23.62 inch (60 cm) (Female) · 23.62 inch (60 cm) – 25.59 inch (65 cm) (Male)




General Appearance
The first impression of a good German Shepherd Dog is that of a strong, agile, well-muscled animal, alert and full of life. It is well balanced, with harmonious development of the forequarter and hindquarter. The dog is longer than tall, deep-bodied, and presents an outline of smooth curves rather than angles. It looks substantial and not spindly, giving the impression, both at rest and in motion, of muscular fitness and nimbleness without any look of clumsiness or soft living. The ideal dog is stamped with a look of quality and nobility - difficult to define, but unmistakable when present. Secondary sex characteristics are strongly marked, and every animal gives a definite impression of masculinity or femininity, according to its sex.



Training &Temperament

He is a loyal family pet and a good guard dog, the ideal choice for many families. He requires regular exercise. Training is one of the most important responsibilities you have as a dog owner. Basic obedience training will make your dog a better companion and strengthen the bond between the two of you. Classes—ranging from puppy or kindergarten to adult and advanced obedience training—are available in most cities, offered by local German Shepherd Dog clubs or all-breed kennel clubs. For the more serious owners, there are competition classes and dog shows.  Temperament: Alert, Confident, Courageous, Curious, Intelligent, Loyal, Obedient, Watchful
.


Coat
&
GROOMING


More brushing can be expected during shedding season. An occasional bath will keep them clean and look their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.



HEALTH
Like all breeds, there may be some health issues, like hip and elbow dysplasia and eye disease. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of German Shepherd Dogs are healthy dogs.
Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a German Shepherd Dog can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.





Boxer Puppies

OUR LITTLE HELPERS

German Shepherd Puppies

ABOUT THE BOXER DOG

Although it has reached its greatest perfection in Germany during the past hundred years, the Boxer springs from a line of dogs known throughout the whole of Europe since the 16th century. Prior to that time, ancestors of the breed would hardly be recognized as Boxers could they be placed beside modern specimens. Still, evidence points to the Boxer as one of the many descendants of the old fighting dog of the high valleys of Tibet.

The Boxer is the cousin to practically all recognized breeds of the Bulldog type, and these all go back to basic Molossus blood. Few other strains can claim such courage, stamina,  from this line, emanates the attractive fawn color that has recurred throughout the centuries. 


Size, Proportion, Substance:
Adult males 23 to 25 inches; females 21½ to 23½ inches at the withers. Proper balance and quality of the individual should be of primary importance since there is no size disqualification. Proportion - The body in profile is square in that a horizontal line from the front of the forechest to the rear projection of the upper thigh should equal the length of a vertical line dropped from the top of the withers to the ground. Substance – Sturdy, with balanced musculature. Males larger boned than females.

General Appearance
The ideal Boxer is a medium-sized, square-built dog of good substance with short back, strong limbs, and short, tight-fitting coat. His well-developed muscles are clean, hard, and appear smooth under taut skin. His movements denote energy. The gait is firm yet elastic, the stride free and ground-covering, the carriage proud. Developed to serve as a guard, working, and companion dog, he combines strength and agility with elegance and style. His expression is alert and his temperament steadfast and tractable.
The chiseled head imparts to the Boxer a unique individual stamp. It must be in correct proportion to the body. The broad, blunt muzzle is the distinctive feature, and great value is placed upon its being of proper form and balance with the skull.


Training &
Temperament
They are patient and spirited with children, but also protective, making them a popular choice for families. Their heritage as a chaser of the wild game means that they spend a good deal of time jumping and leaping about, and as young dogs, they are constantly in need of correction to teach them to stay “down.” They need daily exercise. Boxers are highly intelligent but intolerant of repetitious commands that they consider boring - they definitely have minds of their own and are excellent problem solvers

The Boxer was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training.


Coat
&
Grooming
A soft bristle brush will help keep the coat in good condition. An occasional bath, especially if they are dirty from romping in the outdoors will also keep them looking their best. Their strong nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

HEALTH
Like all breeds, there may be some health issues like cardiomyopathy and hypothyroidism. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Boxers are healthy dogs.
Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a Boxers can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.



ABOUT THE GREAT DANE

As tall as 32 inches at the shoulder, Danes tower over most other dogs—and when standing on their hind legs, they are taller than most people. These powerful giants are the picture of elegance and balance, with the smooth and easy stride of born noblemen. The coat comes in different colors and patterns, perhaps the best-known being the black-and-white patchwork pattern known as “harlequin.”
Despite their sweet nature, Danes are alert home guardians. Just the sight of these gentle giants is usually enough to make intruders think twice. But those foolish enough to mistake the breed’s friendliness for softness will meet a powerful foe of true courage and spirit. Patient with kids, Danes are people pleasers who make friends easily.
Feed the Great Dane a high-quality dog food appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Give table scraps sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with high fat content. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Owners must be aware that the number-one killer of the breed is bloat, where the stomach distends and twists. The causes of bloat aren’t fully understood, but experts agree that multiple small meals per day and preventing vigorous exercise around mealtimes can help reduce the chances of it happening.
Grooming

For most of the year the Great Dane’s short, smooth coat doesn’t shed much, but given the size of the dog, this can still amount to a fair bit of hair. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will help keep shedding to a minimum. During shedding season once or twice a year, however, hair loss will be more profuse, with a daily brushing ideal. Great Danes need a bath only occasionally, unless they get into something messy. As with all breeds, the Great Dane’s nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

Exercise

Great Danes may seem sedate, but they require daily exercise appropriate to their age. A brisk walk two or three times a day can be enough. They can make good companions on jogs or hikes, but you must wait until the dog is 2 years old to avoid damage to growing joints. Because of the risk of bloat, avoid rigorous exercise around mealtimes. Danes tend to follow their nose wherever a scent takes them, so they should always be kept on a leash and only allowed loose in areas secured with a tall fence. Many Great Danes enjoy participating in agility, obedience, tracking events, weight pulls, and sports such as flyball.
Training

Early socialization and puppy training classes are recommended. For a breed as large and powerful as the Great Dane, obedience training is a must. Socialization—gently exposing the puppy to a wide variety of people, places, and situations—will help him develop into a well-adjusted adult. Great Danes are sociable, friendly, and eager to please, and they respond well to firm, consistent training methods. They need to have human contact, affection, and socialization with other people and animals.

Health

Bloat, or gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), is the number-one killer of Danes. Owners should educate themselves to recognize the signs that bloat could be happening and what to do if so. Many breeders and owners consider a surgery called a prophylactic gastropexy (“preventative tack”) that can help prevent some of the more serious aspects of GDV. Other health issues that can affect the breed include eye and cardiac diseases, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, and hip dysplasia. A responsible breeder will screenbreeding stock for conditions that can affect the breed.
History
​No one is quite sure how or why Great Danes, a German breed, came to be associated with Denmark. (In Germany they’re known as the Deutsche Dog, or “German dog.”) We do know that once upon a time, German nobles used Danes to hunt ferocious wild boars. Later, Danes became famous as protectors of their home and loved ones, a job they are still happy to perform.

General Apperance
The Great Dane combines, in its regal appearance, dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. It is one of the giant working breeds, but is unique in that its general conformation must be so well balanced that it never appears clumsy, and shall move with a long reach and powerful drive. It is always a unit — the Apollo of dogs. A Great Dane must be spirited, courageous, never timid; always friendly and dependable. This physical and mental combination is the characteristic which gives the Great Dane the majesty possessed by no other breed.


The easygoing Great Dane, the mighty “Apollo of Dogs,” is a total joy to live with—but owning a dog of such imposing size, weight, and strength is a commitment not to be entered into lightly. This breed is indeed great, but not a Dane.